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COLEGATE
HOP PLANTS


Colegate's hop is thoroughly hardy and adapted for growth on damp heavy soils and otherwise difficult growing positions. When well grown and allowed to ripen, they are of fine colour, rich in lupulin and the aroma is very English.

PRE-ORDER NOW FOR DELIVERY AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2017.
FOR SALE IN NZ ONLY. SUPPLY LIMITED.
1 YEAR OLD PLANTS - $NZ 30.00

COLEGATE'S, CLUSTER OR GRAPE HOP

HERITAGE HOP FIRST INTRODUCED IN KENT UK 1805

The fledgling NZ hop industry was started in Nelson in 1842, being relatively free of wind to which the hops were susceptible. The first plantings were Green Bine (Fuggle), Bumford (Old Golding), Cluster (Grape, Colegate from Chevening in Kent) and Golding.  

DOWNLOAD STUDY OF EARLY NZ HOPS

Our original Colegate (Kent Cluster) plant used for the propagation of the plants we offer for sale on this web site was found growing along a stream in the Nelson area. It grows and crops very well in North Canterbury with a great English aroma when allowed to ripen and picked in mid to late April.

H E Wright, Handybook for Brewers, 1907
Late varieties-Grape Hops (cones appearing clustered, narrowish in proportion to the length and pointed). Colegates (long, narrow cones) are coarse, strong hops yielding heavy crops in the Weald of Kent and Susex.

Clinch, English Hops, 1919
Colegate's Hops [Late]. These hops are long and narrow in form, and very late ripening. The branches are slender and the leaves deeply serrated. This variety is grown in the clay soils of Kent and Sussex. They were introduced about the year 1805 by Mr David Colegate, of Chevening, in Kent. They have almost gone out of cultivation.

H Lloyd Hind, Brewing Science and Practice, Vol 1, 1938
The Colgate, raised from a wild hop by Mr David Colgate of Chevening in 1805, is a small narrow hop, square in section, with thin pale petals and a coarse flavour. It was the latest hop to ripen, frequently not being ready to pick until October (April - Southern Hemisphere), for which reason it was expensive to grow and has been practically abandoned. Really ripe samples were, however, of quite good quality.

Journal of the Institute of Brewing, Volume 14, 1908, pages 335-336.
Mr. P. K. Lemay, speaking as a practical brewer, said that when purchasing English hops himself, he first of all divided the samples up into five classes, roughly as follows: (1) Goldings, for pale ale brewing, both for copper use and hopping down; (2) Fuggles, for copper use in mild ales and stouts; (3) Colegates, as a rule a hop rich in lupulin, but strong in flavour; very good copper hops for stouts; (4) Henhams and other varieties of large coarse hops, which from a brewing point of view would be a dear hop to buy; (5) Any class of hops showing mould or aphis blight, which to a brewer would be costly at any price. All classes of hops he found varied from season to season, and what would be considered good for hopping-down one year would be quite out of the question another. Brewers could not always depend on a certain class of hops for any one particular use.

THE HOP PLANT - Professor john Percival, MA, FLS, 1905
The latest ripening of all is the Colegate Hop. The cones are long and narrow, square in section, with thin pale greenish-yellow "petals." The plant has green bines, crops heavily, and is readily distinguished from all other cultivated sorts by the roughness of its branches and leaf ribs, as well as by the deeper serrations on the edges of the leaves. The Colegate hop is thoroughly hardy and adapted for growth on the damp heavy soils of the Weald and other similar districts. When well grown, they are of fine colour and the aroma is usually good.

SHIPPING STARTS SPRING 2017.
EXPECT DELIVERY SEPTEMBER 2017
* CURRENT SEASON PLANTS - $30.00
INCLUDES GST & TRACKED POSTAGE
LIMITED SUPPLY

AVAILABLE NOW FOR PRE-ORDER

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ACID COMPOSITION

Alpha Acid Composition 4.5%
Beta Acid Composition 5% - 6%
Co-Humulone Composition 31%-32% 

CONE CHARACTERISTICS

Lupulin Color Yellow
Cone Size Medium
Cone Density Loose

GROWTH / STORAGE

Maturity: Mid Season
Yield: Low at 1000 - 1600 kg/hectare
Growth Rate: Moderate to Vigorous
Susceptibility to Disease and Pests: Good
Storability: Maintains 65%-80% alpha acid comtents after 6 months storage at 20 deg. C
Ease of Harvest: Good Pickability

OIL COMPOSITION

Total Oil Composition 0.28 g/100 grams
Myrcene Oil Composition: 30%
Humulene Oil Composition: 16%
Caryophyllene Oil Composition: 7%
Farnesene Oil Composition 0.29%

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